Rei Quarter Dome 3 Full Detailed Review

Full Review Of Rei Quarter Dome 3

The Rei Quarter Dome 3 is held back majorly by its floor space i.e., 39.4 square feet. It’s the smallest amongst the three-person tents tested. On top of that, the tent is tall in height but narrow in width. This makes it easier for tall people but increases proximity to tentmates. Despite this, the tent has the second-lowest peak height in the set. However, it is more of a square-shaped tent, which means that it provides greater headspace at the sides than lower-profile tents.

Pros Of Rei Quarter Dome 3

Cons Of Rei Quarter Dome 3

Packability Of Rei Quarter Dome 3

REI cut down on weight by using a less durable fabric on the stuff sacks. Hence, they are to be handled carefully if you want to protect them from tearing while stuffing. It is the second smallest tent in the test and compresses to become a cylinder. It’s also the second lightest tent we looked at, which is impressive considering how many poles it has.

Setup Of Rei Quarter Dome 3

Our tester’s first solo setup time was 6:30, which is around the median for this test set. The setup method is rather intuitive, but first-time users should practise at home to get the hang of it. At first glance, the Quarter Dome 3’s single lightweight aluminium pre-connected pole set may seem perplexing. The tent feet are colour matched, and the asymmetrical pole has a blue and orange side.

Weather-resistance Of Rei Quarter Dome 3

One significant drawback of the Quarter Dome 3 is its high walls and exposed profile, which limit its effectiveness in windy conditions. It has the profile of a much larger tent while yet attempting to be light enough to carry on overnight excursions. The elaborate pole design gets it halfway there.The sides, due to their height and flatness, become problematic in windy conditions. The lightweight fabric floor requires a group tarp for protection. A ground tarp can be bought separately from REI for $60, but it further increases the weight. The presence of small plastic buckles cast doubt on the tent’s durability despite the fact that no problems were faced during testing. The tent is made mostly of mesh, which enhances ventilation.

Features Of Rei Quarter Dome 3

The Quarter Dome 3 has two doors, and each has an adequate vestibule space. All four corners contain a cargo net where delicate items such as sunglasses or a lamp could be kept. The outside is also accessible at the top through a zippered vent.

Additional Product Information

3 pounds 12 ounces is the minimum trial weight.

4 pounds 3 ounces Max / Packaged Weight

39.4 square feet of interior floor space

Vestibule Dimensions: 6.7+6.7+5.6 sq foot

Interior Peak Height: 42 in.

Spacious tent with ultralight materials. The mesh facilitates a clear 360 view of the surrounding. The tent weighs 4 pounds and offers great packability. It’s designed ideally for 2 persons, but 3 people can also fit in while the tent remains snug.

The tent withstood an 8-hour rain and was still dry (the top was a bit moist, though). The vent points and the big vent above the headspace are amazing. Three vestibules are a great feature!

Pros

Cons

Setup:

Quite simple to pitch, but it’s recommended to practice setting it up at home beforehand. The one-dubbed pole system is a bit difficult (make sure the hubs point down so the tent can attach).

Stability:

The stakes aren’t that strong, but they can withstand an all-night rainstorm. I did pitch the rain fly firmly, but it loosened up a bit after being damp. (not sure how normal this is for a tent).

We stayed mostly dry during the rain, but it was a bit warm with the 3 of us inside. The reason was probably that we didn’t open the side vents much. We got out in the rain too. A smaller guy could get in without letting the water in. A tall guy, however, could not get in without opening the zipper too wide, and that meant water could come in. f the cross pole extended just a smidgen, it would help this situation.

Storage/Vestibules:

There are three vestibules. It’s cumbersome to fit a pack and shoes in the side vestibules because they are small. Both had to be squeezed in without becoming wet. Large packs will have a difficult time if they are not leaning against the tent wall. I want to keep two packs in the third vestibule from now on (great access point at the head of the tent with a side to side zipper). Because the walls are vertical, there is more room and can easily fit two packs. Placing two-thirds of the packs in the third vestibule also enables shoes to fit easily in the side vestibules, making entering and exiting the tent simpler.

There are 3 storage pockets: two at the top one at the feet. So if you sleep in 696 manners, each of the 3 persons gets a pocket. If I were to nitpick, I’d say there should have been more pockets. Top pockets were dampened by the 8-hour rain, but that could’ve been prevented had we vented out the tent a little more.

Packability:

The stuff sack included probably won’t last long, but the tent has great packability. The tent can be compacted really small despite being so big.

All in all, I’m content with this tent. I did a lot of research on different products, and this one provided the best value. Our primary aim was a lightweight tent, but this one ironically provides more space too. It’s weird getting accustomed to the UL materials, but I’m certain they’ll last. In case they don’t, one can avail of REI’s great return policy. It was designed for 3p, but I’d recommend it to be used as 2p to increase comfort significantly.

Source: I bought it new.

Price Paid: $300 on sale (Orig. $379)

THE VERDICT

The REI Co-op Quarter Dome 3 landed neatly in the middle of the test set and provided the best value for money. It’s a very durable tent, which performs well in most conditions. Its greatest drawback is its small size which adversely affects comfort. If you are planning to take Rei Quarter Dome 3 on snowy mountains and love to ski then you should check Scarpa f1 for a perfect combo.